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PHYTOPROTECTION 1998 (79) : 94 – 102

Entomopathogenic Nematodes – Save Biocontrol Agents for Sustainable Systems
Ralf-Udo Elhers

PHYTOPROTECTION 79 : 94-102

[Entomopathogenic Nematodes – Save Biocontrol Agents for Sustainable Systems] Manuscrit disponible en format pdf


PHYTOPROTECTION 1998 (79) : 103 – 106

Research Challenges and Needs for Safe Use of Transgenic Organisms : Introduction
Ervin Balázs

PHYTOPROTECTION 79 : 103-106

[Research Challenges and Needs for Safe Use of Transgenic Organisms : Introduction] Manuscrit disponible en format pdf


PHYTOPROTECTION 1998 (79) : 112 – 116

Virus Resistant Transgenic Sweet Potato with the CP Gene : Current Challenge and Perspective of its Use
Masamichi Nishiguchi and Masaki Mori

PHYTOPROTECTION 79 : 112-116

[Virus Resistant Transgenic Sweet Potato with the CP Gene : Current Challenge and Perspective of its Use] Manuscrit disponible en format pdf

(version française non disponible)

Virus diseases of sweet potato are very prevalent and often seriously damage to the plants. Especially sweet potato feathery mottle virus severe strain (SPFMV-S) causes russet crack disease in Japan. In order to confer virus resistance against SPFMV using current biotechnology, we have produced transgenic sweet potato with an expression vector plasmid harboring the coat protein (CP) gene as well as hygromycin phosphotransferase gene (HPT). The plasmid was introduced into mesophyll protoplasts of a sweet potato breeding line, Chikei 682-11 (Ipomoea batatas L.(Lam.)) by electroporation. Protoplatsts were further cultured in the presence of hygromycin. Some of the hygromycin resistant calli were grown to form adventitious shoots. Southern blot analysis with CP and HPT genes showed that these genes were integrated into the chromosomes in four lines. Expression of the CP gene was confirmed by Northern and dot immuno blot analyses. Each line was grafted with the SPFMV-S infected morning glory (I. nill) to reveal any virus resistance conferred. After three months from the graft-inoculation, these transgenic plants were used for ELISA test in order to know any virus infection. There was no significant differences of ELISA values between the inoculated-transgenic and the non inoculated-virus free plants, suggesting that these transgenic plants were not infected with the virus. They produced storage roots, from which the young shoots were again found to be virus-free by ELISA. We concluded that these transgenic plants were highly resistant to the virus. Concerns about the releasing transgenic plants that contain genes from other species include the potential weediness of the plants as well as the potential flow of the transgenic genes to other plants through normal outcrossing. Usually sweet potato is a vegetatively propagated and hardly flowers during growing seasons in Japan. Under these circumstances it might be safe to release these transgenic plants. One concern unique to virus resistant transgenic plants is that a viral sequence from transgene may be potentially incorporated by RNA recombination into a virus that may infect the transgenic plants. There is no useful information available on the occurrence of recombinant virus under the very high level of resistance. From the point; whether or not the frequency of recombination in the transgenic plants greater than that in plants with two or more viruses, it would be at least much lower in these highly virus resistant transgenic plants.

PHYTOPROTECTION 1998 (79) : 107 – 111

Safe Utilisation of Transgenic Virus-resistant Plants
Mark Tepfer

PHYTOPROTECTION 79 : 107-111

[Safe Utilisation of Transgenic Virus-resistant Plants] Manuscrit disponible en format pdf


PHYTOPROTECTION 1998 (79) : 117 – 120

Fungal Disease Control in Banana, a Tropical Monocot : Transgenic Plants in the Third World?
László Sági, Serge Remy and Rony Swennen

PHYTOPROTECTION 79 : 117-120

[Fungal Disease Control in Banana, a Tropical Monocot : Transgenic Plants in the Third World?] Manuscrit disponible en format pdf